‌SGSAH Summer School 19-21 June 2017

Registration for the SGSAH Summer School has now closed.

If you have already registered and have a query please email admin@sgsah.ac.uk

Programme

Programme

You can find the programme below. A PDF version of the programme which includes details on the venues is available here, Summer School 2017 Brochure

Monday 19th June | 11am-1pm

Integrity & Ethics for the Arts & Humanities

Sophie Welch, Halocline Coaching & Consultancy

The arts and humanities can sometimes be side-lined in discussions around research integrity and ethical considerations. This workshop will remedy that by putting our disciplines centre-stage, using real examples from relevant subject areas to think through what integrity means for you, and what it takes to be an ethical researcher in the arts and humanities. 

How to get published: Demistifying the publishing process

Laura Williamson, Edinburgh University Press

This workshop will offer insights and advice into the publishing processes leading up to book publication.  The workshop will guide attendees through the academic publishing process; from selecting a publisher and writing a book proposal through to manuscript preparation.

The presentation will cover:

  • Publication routes and selecting a publisher
  • Converting a PhD thesis into a book
  • Writing a book proposal
  • The peer review process
  • Negotiating a contract
  • Manuscript preparation and production

So You Want to be an Academic?

Michael Rayner, University of Highlands and Islands

Karen Furnace, University of Highlands and Islands

Ruth Meyer, Universities Scotland

This workshop will explore the general environment within which academics live and work in the present day, including key aspects of policy and practice both inside an HEI and outside, and the expectations that will be on them for research, teaching, knowledge exchange, and public engagement. The session will involve talks and discussion sessions, plus some practical exercises, by the end of which you will have a better understanding of the policy framework and structures in which academic staff work, and be aware of resources to help you find out more about them. 

Designing teaching in the Arts and Humanities: Managing the paradox of structuring delivery and facilitating creativity / originality in the discipline. (Curriculum Design) (10am-5pm)

Prof. Vicky Gunn, Glasgow School of Art

Dr Amanda Sykes, University of Glasgow

This workshop addresses the thorny issue of structuring teaching and assessment to encourage students to engage at the same time as freeing their minds to challenge disciplinary norms. It:

  • Draws on a common paradigm of course design used in higher education known as constructive alignment (Biggs); 
  • Shows how useful this is as a starting place; 
  • Moves on to demonstrate the paradoxes of facilitating creative criticality amongst students in the Arts and Humanities if we depend on constructive alignment.

Between them, Amanda and Vicky will weave practical activities and theoretical considerations to foster an understanding of the nuances of course design in the Arts and Humanities.

By the end of this workshop, participants will:

  • Design an aligned course and be able to evaluate and justify how each of the elements of the course contribute to the overall design;
  • Critically reflect on when and how best to use alignment and when to engender structured 'unstructure' to encourage creative approaches;
  • Recognise the differences between humanities teaching in the lecture and seminar context and studio-based teaching in an Art School context.

This workshop will be of particular interest to doctoral researchers in all disciplines of the arts and humanities who are interested in pursuing an academic career. It is likely to be more relevant to those in the later stages of their PhD, but anyone who is interested to attend is welcome.

Feminist Research in Scotland: Methods & networks (11am-5pm)

The Postgraduate Gender Research Network of Scotland

Glasgow Women's Library

Designed in collaboration with the Postgraduate Gender Research Network of Scotland, this workshop enables you to share your research with other feminist doctoral researchers across Scotland, to share methods and experiences and to find out about the resources available to support your research at the Glasgow Women’s Library.

By the end of this workshop, you will have:

  • extended your network of feminist researchers across Scotland,
  • the ability to reflect critically on the principles underpinning feminist research in a variety of disciplinary contexts and your own practice as a researcher through a feminist lens;
  • a good introduction to a wide range of research resources at GWL and in other feminist archives, libraries and information centres;
  • a grasp of the wide range of ways research using feminist artefacts and texts can be used.

Monday 19th June | 2pm-4pm

Play as a Research Method

Dr Iain Donald, Abertay University

The aim of this workshop is to set out and explore the role of ‘play’ in the Arts & Humanities research and to consider how play can help identify relationships, translate meaning and transform research into different forms of knowledge. This workshop introduces using play and games as a way of analysing and exploring data sets, contexts, and scenarios to generate novel solutions and insights.

The Art(s) of Failure

Chris Fremantle, Robert Gordon University

Dr Elizabeth Reeder, University of Glasgow

There is little in this life that is more human than failure, and yet, there is not nearly enough discussion or action around how failure works within our creative and critical practice as writers, makers and thinkers across disciplines. 

Podcasting in Academia: Getting started

Dr Colin Gray, The Podcast Host

In an educational setting, Podcasting works wonders. It can be used to inspire and develop staff, offering professional development that much more easily fits into a hectic academic schedule. It can be used to build community in both staff and students, offering campus news, information and personal stories.

It can also be used to effectively support student learning. Podcasts can offer supplementary information, class summaries, student conversations and contributions, or even recorded lecture highlights.

A Stone-Thrower to Pigeons: Disruption as knowledge

Anthony Schrag, Queen Margaret University

The notion of ‘engagement’, ‘participation’ and ‘impact’ are key aspects of research and funding requirements, however, there is a assumption that these must necessarily be premised on ameliorative and/or congenial notions. Taking on board ethical considerations, this workshop considers how disruption, intervention and ‘productive conflict’ might also satisfy these requirements and also produce excellent research. 

Designing teaching in the Arts and Humanities: Managing the paradox of structuring delivery and facilitating creativity / originality in the discipline. (Curriculum Design) (10am-5pm)

Prof. Vicky Gunn, Glasgow School of Art

Dr Amanda Sykes, University of Glasgow

This workshop addresses the thorny issue of structuring teaching and assessment to encourage students to engage at the same time as freeing their minds to challenge disciplinary norms. It: 

  • Draws on a common paradigm of course design used in higher education known as constructive alignment (Biggs); 
  • Shows how useful this is as a starting place; 
  • Moves on to demonstrate the paradoxes of facilitating creative criticality amongst students in the Arts and Humanities if we depend on constructive alignment.

Between them, Amanda and Vicky will weave practical activities and theoretical considerations to foster an understanding of the nuances of course design in the Arts and Humanities.

By the end of this workshop, participants will: 

  • Design an aligned course and be able to evaluate and justify how each of the elements of the course contribute to the overall design;
  • Critically reflect on when and how best to use alignment and when to engender structured 'unstructure' to encourage creative approaches;
  • Recognise the differences between humanities teaching in the lecture and seminar context and studio-based teaching in an Art School context.

This workshop will be of particular interest to doctoral researchers in all disciplines of the arts and humanities who are interested in pursuing an academic career. It is likely to be more relevant to those in the later stages of their PhD, but anyone who is interested to attend is welcome.

Feminist Research in Scotland: Methods & networks (10am-5pm)

The Postgraduate Gender Research Network of Scotland

Glasgow Women's Library

Designed in collaboration with the Postgraduate Gender Research Network of Scotland, this workshop enables you to share your research with other feminist doctoral researchers across Scotland, to share methods and experiences and to find out about the resources available to support your research at the Glasgow Women’s Library.

By the end of this workshop, you will have:

  • extended your network of feminist researchers across Scotland,
  • the ability to reflect critically on the principles underpinning feminist research in a variety of disciplinary contexts and your own practice as a researcher through a feminist lens;
  • a good introduction to a wide range of research resources at GWL and in other feminist archives, libraries and information centres;
  • a grasp of the wide range of ways research using feminist artefacts and texts can be used.

Tuesday 20th June | 9.30am-12.30pm

When Methods Meet: An Introduction to Innovation in Mixed Methods

Prof Graham Crow, Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences

This workshop uses on-line resources based on conversations about innovation in combining research methods. It focuses on why researchers might wish to combine methods in new ways, and the issues that are raised when this is done.

Making your Research Count: How to make what you are doing matter beyond the academy

Dr Kenneth Brophy, University of Glasgow

Dr Alan Leslie, Northlight Heritage

This workshop will provide practical methods and advice on how (and how not) to engage meaningfully non-academic audiences with your research.

Blogging for Humanities PhDs (90 minute workshop)

Dr Benjamin White, University of Glasgow

This workshop is an introduction to blogging, and how you can use it to develop your writing, your profile as a researcher, and above all your PhD without creating extra demands on your time and energy.

How we Write (90 minute workshop)

Dr Benjamin White, University of Glasgow

This is workshop is a chance to think about how we write. That is, it’s not about how ‘to’ write, or how we should be writing, but how academics actually do write, in a real world that includes plenty of other demands on our time and energy. It’s inspired by a recent book that you can download for free (or leave a donation) here http://punctumbooks.com/titles/how-we-write/

Turning your Thoughts into a Thesis (9.30am-4.30pm)

Dr Chris Russell

This workshop explores how to best manage your research, your time and how to turn your thoughts into a thesis.

An Introduction to the Digital Humanities (9.30am-4.30pm)

Dr Anouk Lang, University of Edinburgh

This workshop will introduce participants to the basic elements of digital humanities research: obtaining data, finding tools and techniques for data analysis, and integrating those analyses into a scholarly workflow. By the end of this workshop, participants will have:

  • Learnt to use tools with which to obtain, analyse and visualise data
  • A sense of whether and how digital humanities approaches are appropriate to their own research project and planned academic career trajectory

Scottish Practice Research Network Workshops

Re-presenting Practice Research for Publication (11am-1pm)

The Whole Package - Making a thesis. (2pm-4pm)

Scottish Practice Research Network open discussion forum (4pm-5pm)

Various speakers, for detailed information on the workshops please view the programme for Tuesday 20th June | 1pm-4pm.


Tuesday 20th June | 1.30pm-4.30pm

Postgraduate Publications: From proposal to print

e-Sharp

The Kelvingrove Review

Scottish Journal of Performance

This workshop will take you step-by-step through the processes and pitfalls of academic journal editing. Editorial team members from eSharp, the Kelvingrove Review, and the Scottish Journal of Performance will talk about their experiences and work with the group to demystify the processes of academic publishing.

Written Up/Listen Up: Physical archives & oral histories as a source of inspiration for creative writing

Dr Beatrice Colin, University of Strathclyde

Helen Foster, University of Strathclyde

A workshop in two parts exploring archive material as a source of inspiration for creative writing.

Part one, Written Up, will explore how to use archive material such as texts, photographs and other visual images as resources for creative work. Written exercises will support participants as they practice a range of different approaches and techniques in this fun, informal workshop.

Part two, Listen Up will consider the untapped potential of oral history archives as a source for authenticity and creativity in writing; different forms of sound archives (physical and online) as sources for creative writing.  Participants will be invited to take part in a series of writing activities using voices from the past to encourage new spontaneous creative response.

Becoming a Digital Humanities Researcher: No coding Skills Required

Dr Diane Scott, University of Glasgow

Dr Luca Guariento, University of Glasgow

This workshop will discuss the various routes that researchers from across the Arts and Humanities can take into the field of Digital Humanities

Turning your thoughts into a Thesis: Project management for Arts & Humanities (9.30am-4.30pm)

Dr Chris Russell

This workshop explores how to best manage your research, your time and how to turn your thoughts into a thesis.

An Introduction to the Digital Humanities (9.30am-4.30pm)

Dr Anouk Lang, University of Edinburgh

This workshop will introduce participants to the basic elements of digital humanities research: obtaining data, finding tools and techniques for data analysis, and integrating those analyses into a scholarly workflow. By the end of this workshop, participants will have:

  • Learnt to use tools with which to obtain, analyse and visualise data
  • A sense of whether and how digital humanities approaches are appropriate to their own research project and planned academic career trajectory

Scottish Practice Research Network Workshops

11am – 1pm: Re-presenting Practice Research for Publication

Prof Joseph DeLappe, Abertay University

Dr Colin Herd, University of Glasgow

Dr Laura Bissell, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

Prof Ken Neill, Glasgow School of Art

Dr Minty Donald, University of Glasgow

Putting the creative work out there is an important and overlooked stage of the research process, and raises particular challenges in practice research approaches. This workshops asks how and if practice research can be re-represented for academic and scholarly publication, or into other published formats beyond the academic. Speakers connected with current leading academic and artistic research publications will discuss the opportunities, challenges and modalities of disseminating practice research using different forms than the original practice.

Facilitated by Martin Cathcart and Alyson Keehan

1pm – 2pm: Lunch

2pm–4pm: The Whole Package – Making a thesis.

Alastair Cole

Aideen Doran

Anthony Schrag

Sarah Hopfinger

Iain Findlay Walsh

This workshop examines the relationship between the ‘practice’ elements of the thesis and its ‘written’ form. Guest speakers, involved in a variety of practices, will discuss their approaches to creative arts inquiry, sharing the challenges and successes of making a total body of PhD work, that is more than the practice. Examples of different approaches used by recently graduated doctoral researchers will be covered, as well as differing disciplinary expectations and requirements. Time will be allocated for group discussion about the nature, and future, of this burgeoning approach to academic inquiry in the Arts and Humanities.

Facilitated by Nicola Black and Mona Bozdog

4-5pm: Scottish Practice Research Network open discussion forum: Future Plans

Facilitated by Ines Fragao Bento Coelho and Jonathan Baxter; launch of website: Richy Carey

5pm–7pm: Closing drinks @ The Old Hairdresser's


Wednesday 21st June | 9.30am-12.30pm

Working through Co-production with Community Groups

Dr Stuart Jeffrey, Glasgow School of Art

Daisy Abbott, Glasgow School of Art

This workshop will look at the logistical, ethical and practical issues arising from co-production work with both pre-existing community groups and communities of interest in the humanities sector, with a focus on heritage/digital technology.

Writing for Different Academic Audiences

Alison McEntee, University of West of Scotland

This workshop will explore the different kinds of writing needed as a researcher, and give you a hands-on opportunity to practice some key approaches. By the end of the session you’ll have a clearer understanding of how to identify your audience and its needs and how to tailor your writing to make the most impact.

Interdisciplinary Research: What is it and how do I do it?

Dr Elspeth Jajdelska, University of Strathclyde

Humanities subjects have a long tradition of borrowing theories from one another and from the social sciences. Social history is often embedded in insights from economics, anthropology and sociology for example, and the cultural studies approach pioneered by Stuart Hall, Raymond Williams and others was heavily informed by political theory.

But the recent emphases on interdisciplinarity, often encouraged from government and funding agencies, goes beyond these sorts of conceptual exchanges to methodologies. Digital humanities, for example, is more and more dependent on expertise in software and statistics.

Dr Jajdelska's research career has involved two phases of deep engagement with the disciplines of sociolinguistics and, more recently, cognitive psychology. In this session Dr Jajdelska discusses some of the opportunities and obstacles she has experienced, including training and competence, peer review across disciplines, expectations of funding bodies, finding partners and finding audiences for interdisciplinary work.

How to Organise a Pop Up in a Brewery (and other places)

Anne Rushing, Pop Up! Scotland

This workshop will introduce students the basics of how to put on a creative pop up event. They will also get a chance to explore their creativity and get hands on with the project.

From research to impact: what is it, why should we care and how do we get there

Rose-Marie Barbeau, University of Glasgow

This workshop will help you learn how to identify, articulate, plan for, encourage and evidence your research impact, regardless of your field of research.

By the end of this workshop, participants will: 

  • Understand the impact agenda and its influence in a research career
  • Be able to articulate their potential impact and the outline of an impact strategy
  • Have identified opportunities and tools to maximise their potential impact

Introduction to Broadcasting with BBC (9.30am-4.30pm)

Ever wondered how a television or radio programme gets made? Or what a programme researcher actually does? Or how to become the next Lucy Worsley (with or without the dressing up)? This new workshop aims to answer these questions and more. Kindly hosted by BBC Scotland at its flagship Pacific Quay building in Glasgow and consisting of talks, tours and practical exercises, this full day event will involve senior BBC staff and some of Scotland's most exciting and successful independent production companies. By the end of the session you'll have a basic understanding of how the commissioning process works and be better able to explore the ways you can connect your research skills and subjects with these vital industries.

By the end of this workshop, participants will have an overview of the broadcasting industry and, in particular:

  • TV commissioning - from idea to pilot to commission
  • Radio commissioning - from idea to pilot to commission
  • The perspective of independent programme makers as well as BBC editors and producers
  • The role of research in broadcasting

Wednesday 21st June | 1.30pm-4.30pm

SGSAH Research Slam

The SGSAH Research Slam is an exciting competition to explain your research dynamically and quickly. Applications to participate have now closed, but if you wish to be part of the audience then click here to register.

Introduction to Broadcasting with BBC (9.30am-4.30pm)

Ever wondered how a television or radio programme gets made? Or what a programme researcher actually does? Or how to become the next Lucy Worsley (with or without the dressing up)? This new workshop aims to answer these questions and more. Kindly hosted by BBC Scotland at its flagship Pacific Quay building in Glasgow and consisting of talks, tours and practical exercises, this full day event will involve senior BBC staff and some of Scotland's most exciting and successful independent production companies. By the end of the session you'll have a basic understanding of how the commissioning process works and be better able to explore the ways you can connect your research skills and subjects with these vital industries.

By the end of this workshop, participants will have an overview of the broadcasting industry and, in particular:

  • TV commissioning - from idea to pilot to commission
  • Radio commissioning - from idea to pilot to commission
  • The perspective of independent programme makers as well as BBC editors and producers
  • The role of research in broadcasting

Please note that lunch will be available on all days.

Accommodation

The deadline for applying for accommodation has now passed. If you have difficulty attending the Summer School due to accomodation issues please contact admin@sgsah.ac.uk .

Travel

Travel expenses will be paid for those at a distance to help them attend. Travel costs will be reimbursed only from your home institution (must be a SGSAH member HEI) to place of event unless there are exceptional circumstances. For┬átravel guidance please see our webpages here.

Contact Us

If you have any questions regarding the event itself (including letters of invitation or programme content), please email admin@sgsah.ac.uk